What is an arm lift?

An arm lift, also known as a brachioplasty, is a surgical procedure designed to remove excessive skin or fatty deposits to achieve better contouring. It effectively tones and tightens the arms almost instantly. In some cases, liposuction is combined with the arm lift to remove additional fatty deposits in the upper arms. An arm lift is often performed to correct sagging or hanging flesh after patients have lost substantial amounts of weight. Others may opt for the procedure if they can’t seem to get rid of the loose skin beneath their arms or to remove skin that has been damaged by the sun.

Ideal patients for an Arm Lift

A good arm lift candidate is someone who has lost a lot of weight and is unable to tighten or tone the loose flesh beneath their arms. Older women with an accumulation of excess flesh can also benefit from the surgery.

If you feel that you are the right candidate for brachioplasty or an arm lift procedure, schedule an appointment for a free consultation. Should you and Dr. Whitlock agree that the surgery can help, he will patiently answer all of your questions and our staff will review payment option plans with you.

A quick overview of the arm lift procedure

An Arm Lift generally takes about a couple of hours to perform. A local anesthesia or general anesthesia may be used. An incision is made on either the back or inside of the arm, generally from just under the arm to the elbow. In cases where excessive flesh is removed, the incision may run from the elbow to beneath the arm and include part of the chest. Once the excess skin is cut away, the remaining skin is tightened and sewn.

What to expect after the surgery

The sutures are removed after about two weeks if they haven’t already dissolved. Expect to experience some bruising, swelling and pain after the surgery. Dr. Whitlock will prescribe a pain medication to offer some relief. Swelling generally subsides after a couple of weeks.

Arm Lift patients usually can shower about a week following the surgery and are permitted to resume normal work activities after two weeks. However, any heavy lifting or strenuous exercise should be avoided for at least four weeks.

Dr. Whitlock will provide you with preoperative directions to reduce the risk of bleeding, swelling, and infection. Patients are advised to stop taking certain medicines (such as NSAIDs or aspirin) or to quit smoking or drinking. Eating a diet high in protein can also speed up recovery.

Brachioplasty risks can include scarring, numbness, clotting, infection, and swelling. However, if you follow the preoperative instructions, the foregoing risks are rare.